Adjective "astute" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/əˈstjuːt/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Having or showing an ability to accurately assess situations or people and turn this to one's advantage.
  1. 'An immediate promise to continue funding the service is both the fair and politically astute thing to do.'
  2. 'I was incensed that my friend, an astute judge of character, had said yes.'
  3. 'Our leader is intelligent and astute, as we have seen with her handling of Iraq.'
  4. 'In the last general election no one, not even the most astute of pundits, foresaw his demise.'
  5. 'Such astute use of credit cards has kept Margaret in financially good shape for 15 years.'
  6. 'They defended superbly, attacked courageously and played the most astute tactical game.'
  7. 'If officers have to make decisions for the Council, they need to be visionary and commercially astute.'
  8. 'This is a very astute move on Ryan's part.'
  9. 'In re-inventing Manchester for the new millennium, the city council has proved very astute.'
  10. 'He is learned, astute, admirably sensible, and possesses an elegant and clear prose style.'

Definitions

1. of keen penetration or discernment; sagacious: an astute analysis.

2. clever; cunning; ingenious; shrewd: an astute merchandising program; an astute manipulation of facts.

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be astute in/at/on days."

"people can be astute in shoppings."

"people can be astute in businesses."

"people can be astute for nuanceses."

"people can be astute by realisings."

More examples++

Origin

Early 17th century: from obsolete French astut or Latin astutus, from astus ‘craft’.