Adjective "prejudiced" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈprɛdʒədɪst/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Having or showing a dislike or distrust that is derived from prejudice; bigoted.
  1. 'prejudiced views'
  2. 'After all, who would allow a prejudiced view or ideal to influence the formation of the core of one's character or values?'
  3. 'She took a big breath and sighed, ‘I'm sorry for losing my temper for no reason, and calling you a chauvinistic, sexist, prejudiced pig.’'
  4. 'You're not supposed to show yourself to be at all prejudiced or bigoted.'
  5. 'They examined whether racially prejudiced attitudes could have a negative influence on the contact-recognition relationship.'
  6. 'Demeaning, degrading, bigoted, and prejudiced ideas and behaviours are fought every day around the world.'
  7. 'Of course, these beliefs do not reflect reality; they reflect the prejudiced views of those who hold them.'
  8. 'Attitudes towards Jews vary across the five countries surveyed with Belgians, Germans and the French ‘most likely to hold a prejudiced view of Jews’.'
  9. 'Anyone who reads the Biblical Commission's document will find these and many other prejudiced views thoroughly discredited.'

Definitions

1. an unfavorable opinion or feeling formed beforehand or without knowledge, thought, or reason.

2. any preconceived opinion or feeling, either favorable or unfavorable.

3. unreasonable feelings, opinions, or attitudes, especially of a hostile nature, regarding an ethnic, racial, social, or religious group.

4. such attitudes considered collectively: The war against prejudice is never-ending.

5. damage or injury; detriment: a law that operated to the prejudice of the majority. verb

More examples(as adjective)

"policies can be prejudiced against places."

"itselfs can be prejudiced by reductions."

"people can be prejudiced."

"views can be prejudiced."

"themes can be prejudiced."

More examples++

Origin

(prejudice)