Adjective "substantial" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/səbˈstanʃ(ə)l/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Of considerable importance, size, or worth.
  1. 'He forced her to open the safe, took what police have described as ‘a substantial amount of cash’ and left the hotel, passing one of the cleaners who was coming in.'
  2. 'I had lost substantial amounts of weight and was down to a size 6 because I was running on nervous energy.'
  3. 'There is a substantial amount of imported food in this country which has become cheaper because of the strengthening of the Euro particularly against Sterling.'
  4. 'This finding is substantial considering the small size of the sample.'
  5. 'A postmaster has described his horrifying ordeal as he was threatened at gunpoint by three masked robbers, who escaped with a substantial amount of cash.'
  6. 'At least one suspected armed robber was left behind by his partners in crime after a substantial amount of cash was stolen from a South Yorkshire post office.'
  7. 'The pair hope to raise a substantial amount of cash for their two chosen charities, York and North Yorkshire Community Foundation and York One World Linking Association.'
  8. 'It has raised a substantial amount of cash to fund the move and also received a £260,000 Government grant to specially convert one of its galleries to house the work.'
  9. 'A police spokesman said all of the units within the Bridge Street premises were entered and a substantial amount of cash and property removed.'
  10. 'In the latest incident two masked men - one with a handgun the other with a cosh - tied up the post master before escaping with a substantial amount of cash from Houghton Road Post Office at Thurnscoe.'
  11. 'a row of substantial Victorian villas'
  12. 'I am staying at the exclusive marina of Port St Charles, on the west of the island, a coastline characterised by grand hotels, substantial villas and private mansions.'
  13. 'The resonator is wide in the bass, with a substantial, strongly curved pillar and neck.'
  14. 'breakfast is a substantial buffet'
  15. 'As for food I have to try and have a substantial meal at a regular time each day.'
  16. 'Just one of the dishes with a bowl of soup and a little salad should prove to be a substantial meal.'
  17. 'A good, substantial meal, perhaps more akin to first-rate home cooking than wildly fancy restaurant food, but none the worse for that.'
  18. 'To make a more substantial meal, serve with some cooked noodles.'
  19. 'Very often these children will get just one meal a day and that would not be a substantial meal.'
  20. 'Indicators of consistent poverty include lack of heating, at least one day in the previous two weeks without a substantial meal, no warm waterproof overcoat or only one pair of strong shoes.'
  21. 'A more substantial meal is available in the guise of lamb cutlets in a plum chutney jus served with couscous and vegetables, for men who just won't eat quiche.'
  22. 'If you wish, add cooked shrimp to the salad or, for a more substantial meal, include slices of cold chicken and rye bread.'
  23. 'It's not such a substantial meal, though, and a little pricey for what you get.'
  24. 'This venue provides substantial meals outside our price range but, with care, modest snacks are available.'
  25. 'a substantial Devon family'
  26. 'Enjoying a substantial social status, they produced topographical memoirs that provided information specifically devoted to the management of colonies by the state.'
Concerning the essentials of something.
  1. 'It is concerned with what is substantial (essentialities, or what makes a thing what it is) in things, processes and relations.'
  2. 'Yet, it appears that the government was not concerned with any substantial violation of the law in this case.'
  3. 'But I have two substantial concerns over abortion.'
Real and tangible rather than imaginary.
  1. 'There's always been a lot of talk about that, and there's always been a lot of lip service paid to it, in my view, rather than anything substantial.'
  2. 'He argues that social activists need to realise that if they want substantial and tangible results, it is the government above all else which they need to influence.'
  3. 'It gave voters a substantial and tangible personal reward and it was something Labour would never do.'

Definitions

1. of ample or considerable amount, quantity, size, etc.: a substantial sum of money.

2. of a corporeal or material nature; tangible; real.

3. of solid character or quality; firm, stout, or strong: a substantial physique.

4. basic or essential; fundamental: two stories in substantial agreement.

5. wealthy or influential: one of the substantial men of the town.

6. of real worth, value, or effect: substantial reasons.

7. relating to the substance, matter, or materia

More examples(as adjective)

"costs can be substantial in terms."

"costs can be substantial in technologies."

"costs can be substantial in equipments."

"turnovers can be substantial at pesos."

"interests can be substantial in/at/on ses."

More examples++

Origin

Middle English: from Old French substantiel or Christian Latin substantialis, from substantia ‘being, essence’ (see substance).