Adjective "scathing" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈskeɪðɪŋ/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Witheringly scornful; severely critical.
  1. 'The book was a scathing attack on the media establishment.'
  2. 'When the motion was narrowly defeated it led to scathing criticism by the national print media in particular, he noted.'
  3. 'A Bradford councillor has made a scathing attack on preservationists who are bitterly opposed to the construction of an Aire Valley motorway.'
  4. 'The inspection report contains scathing criticism of teaching standards in a third of areas and highlights poor management, failure at record-keeping and severe financial difficulties.'
  5. 'True, not everybody loves her; there are some who taunt Martha with sarcastic parodies, bilious caricatures, and scathing articles.'
  6. 'Last week Thai retailers launched a scathing attack on the government for not doing enough to protect them from foreign competitors.'
  7. 'He launched a scathing attack on both the EU and the Department of Marine in advance of tomorrow's blockade of fishing ports.'
  8. 'He is particularly scathing about one member whom he characterises as callous, spineless and non-confrontational to the point of duplicity.'
  9. 'The development has attracted scathing criticism of Federal legislation, which deems the antennae low impact and thus not requiring a development application.'
  10. 'Both were scathing analyses of the relationship of the design profession and the forces of corporate commercialism.'

Definitions

1. bitterly severe, as a remark: a scathing review of the play.

2. harmful, injurious, or searing.

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be scathing in criticisms."

"members can be scathing in criticisms."

"watches can be scathing in/at/on years."

"watches can be scathing about handlings."

"people can be scathing about statements."

More examples++